CFP: Meta-Philosophy of Religion & Meta-Theology
January 13, 2016 — 4:36

Author: Martín Montoya  Category: News  Tags: , , , , , ,   Comments: 0

META-PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION & META-THEOLOGY

We are delighted to announce the new journal TheoLogica, a peer-reviewed international journal. TheoLogica is a multidisciplinary research journal focused on philosophy of religion and theology (analytic theology, natural theology, philosophical theology), exploring philosophical and theological topics with the standards of conceptual clarity and rigorous argumentation, which are recognized (in particular but not exclusively) in the analytic tradition. The Journal adopts the Open Access Journal (free access) in order to promote research and development of philosophy of religion and theology in the Spanish-speaking academy. In order to contribute equally to international scientific discussions held in several languages, articles and reviews written in Spanish, French, English, Italian and German are accepted.

We invite submissions for the first issue of the journal: Meta-philosophy of religion & Meta-theology. The authors will be expected to discuss the nature, methods and aims of philosophy of religion and/or theology from a metaphilosophical or metatheological perspective. The following is a (non-exhaustive) list of possible research topics:

  • What are philosophy of religion and/or analytic theology? What are their subject, their methods and aims?

Nature:

  • Is theology continuous with philosophy and with science? Can it be called a science and in what sense?

Methods:

  • What are the ultimate sources of theology (Scripture, Councils, Tradition, Reason, etc.) and their relative roles? What is the relationship between Scripture and the analytical style of philosophizing? What is the epistemological status of the Scripture in these disciplines?
  • What is the place of argumentation in the methodology of theology?
  • Is there such a thing as theological knowledge? What are the epistemic sources of theological knowledge?

Aims:

  • Is theological knowledge necessary? Are there epistemic conditions for Salvation?

 

  • Do philosophy of religion and theology aim at Wisdom? How is this sapiential dimension to be fostered? Is the analytic style a hindrance for this aim?

 

Deadline for sending the paper: April 30st, 2016

Full papers should be submitted via our website: http://revistatheologica.com, or send your paper to: managingeditor.theologica@gmail.com. Visit the TheoLogica homepage for a description of the journal and instructions to authors.

2016 St Thomas Summer Seminar
September 21, 2015 — 14:08

Author: Alexander Pruss  Category: News  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 0

The 2016 St. Thomas Summer Seminar in Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology

Recent PhDs and current graduate students in philosophy, theology, or religious studies are invited to apply to the 2016 St. Thomas Summer Seminar in Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology. The seminar will be held at the University of St. Thomas, in St. Paul, Minnesota, from June 14th to June 29th, 2016. Participants will receive a stipend of $2000, as well as room and board.

For more information and instructions on how to apply, see:

http://www.stthomas.edu/philosophy/grants/templeton/project/

Topics and Speakers:

THE EPISTEMOLOGY OF DISAGREEMENT:  Earl Conee andThomas Kelly

PASCAL’S WAGER: Thomas Kelly, Gideon Rosen and Michael Rota

THE PROBLEM OF EVIL: Gideon Rosen and Eleonore Stump

UNIVERSALISM: Keith DeRose and Eleonore Stump

EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY AND THE PROBLEM OF EVIL:Michael Murray and Jeff Schloss

HELL: Frances Howard-Snyder and Peter van Inwagen

RELIGION IN THE PUBLIC SQUARE: Christopher Eberle andPaul Weithman

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION FOR A GENERAL AUDIENCE: Janet Martin Soskice

The deadline for receipt of applications is December 1, 2015.

Funded by:

The John Templeton Foundation

The University of St. Thomas

The Society of Christian Philosophers

The University of Notre Dame’s Center for Philosophy of Religion

The John Cardinal O’Hara Chair in Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame

The Rutgers Center for Philosophy of Religion

Job: Chair (Professorship) in Philosophical Theology, University of Birmingham
April 20, 2015 — 4:09

Author: Yujin Nagasawa  Category: News  Tags: , ,   Comments: 0

Building on the outstanding success of Theology in REF 2014, we are now intending to appoint a major international scholar in this key strategic area.

Philosophical Theology is one of two principal strategic directions for the growth of Theology and Religion at Birmingham, and enjoys excellence in research together with strong recruitment. The Chair will play a key role in promoting and expanding Philosophical Theology in the Department of Theology and Religion and in further developing close relations with the Department of Philosophy. We welcome specialities in any area of Philosophical Theology

Informal enquiries may be addressed to Dr David Cheetham (D.Cheetham@bham.ac.uk).

To download the full details and submit an electronic application online visit www.hr.bham.ac.uk/jobs . Alternatively, information can be obtained from 0121 415 9000.

http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AKY697/chair-in-philosophical-theology/

The 2014 St. Thomas Summer Seminar in Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology
November 6, 2013 — 13:30

Author: Alexander Pruss  Category: Uncategorized  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 0

Recent PhDs and current graduate students in philosophy, theology, or religious studies are invited to apply to the 2014 St. Thomas Summer Seminar in Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology. The seminar will be held at the University of St. Thomas, in St. Paul, Minnesota, from June 17th to July 2nd, 2014. Participants will receive a stipend of $2000, as well as room and board. For more information and instructions on how to apply, go to:

http://www.stthomas.edu/philosophy/templeton/project.html

Featuring:
Michael Bergmann and John Hawthorne on the epistemology of religious belief
David Albert and Dean Zimmerman on cosmology and philosophy
Louise Antony and Peter van Inwagen on the problem of evil
John Greco on testimony and religious knowledge, and
Stephen Davis, Craig Evans and Evan Fales on historical evidence and Christianity.

The deadline for receipt of applications is December 1, 2013.

Funded by:
The John Templeton Foundation
The University of St. Thomas
The Society of Christian Philosophers
The University of Notre Dame’s Center for Philosophy of Religion
The John Cardinal O’Hara Chair in Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame
The Rutgers Center for the Philosophy of Religion

(Posting on behalf of Mike Rota)

Omnipotence and the ‘Delimiter of Possibilities’ View
May 20, 2013 — 21:54

Author: Kenny Pearce  Category: Uncategorized  Tags: , , , , ,   Comments: 24

Aquinas notes that some analyses of omnipotence have a serious problem: they reduce the apparently substantive claim “God is omnipotent” to the trivial claim that God “can do all that He is able to do.” Now, perhaps it is true that to be omnipotent is to be able to do everything God is able to do (or at least that omnipotence entails this), but this is hardly an illuminating analysis.
In several places in his Anselmian Explorations, Thomas Morris defends the view that the Anselmian God is the ‘delimiter of possibilities.’ This view has been endorsed by other Anselmians, and I am inclined to it myself. What Morris means by it is that many apparently conceivable worlds are in fact impossible precisely because it is impossible that God should permit them. God exists necessarily, and no world can be actual except by God’s permission. Hence if God’s character (or whatever) prevents him from permitting a state of affairs, then that state of affairs is not genuinely possible.
When this view is combined with a result theory of omnipotence, Aquinas’s worry recurs.

more…

Marc Sanders Foundation Prize in Philosophy of Religion
May 6, 2013 — 17:43

Author: Jon Kvanvig  Category: Uncategorized  Tags: , ,   Comments: 5

Deadline: August 31, 2013.
Formerly the Younger Scholars Prize in Philosophical Theology, the contest has been changed in both substance and title. Now open to those within 15 years of the PhD, the contest is also now generically categorized as a prize in Philosophy of Religion.
The blurb from the foundation is below the fold:

more…

Younger Scholars Prizes–$8000
May 17, 2012 — 7:31

Author: Jon Kvanvig  Category: News  Tags: ,   Comments: 0

Since the summer break is nearly here, I thought I’d remind folks of the Younger Scholars Prize so that the summer break could be used to write/finish entries. Here’s the ad:
goodadthinker.jpg
Prosblogion readers will most likely be interested in the competition details for the Younger Scholars Prize for Philosophical Theology.

Fictions, Imaginations, and the Prima Facie Case Against Divine Benevolence
May 5, 2012 — 14:31

Author: Kenny Pearce  Category: Problem of Evil  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 32

In chapter 6 of his Philosophical Theology (1969), James F. Ross undertakes the very ambitious task of showing that the evil in the world does not provide even a prima facie case against divine moral perfection. Ross takes the phrase ‘a prima facie case’ in the legal sense: to provide a prima facie case is essentially to bring charges that need answering. So, for instance, someone who says that the evils in the world are justified by some greater good which would be impossible without them is conceding that there is a prima facie case and attempting to answer it. Ross believes that there is no such case that needs answering. After explaining his argument, I will show that, even if Ross’s answer to the alleged conflict between the evils of the world and divine moral perfection succeeds, the evils of the world can still be used to make a prima facie case against divine benevolence, and Ross’s strategy cannot be used to defuse this.

more…

Ross’s Theory of Omnipotence Entails Double Predestination
January 27, 2012 — 0:56

Author: Kenny Pearce  Category: Concept of God Divine Providence  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 9

Let E (for ‘election’) be the proposition which says de re of each person who will in fact be saved that he or she will be saved. That is, E is the longest conjunction of the form ‘John will be saved, and Mary will be saved, and Lois will be saved…’ which is true. Let R (for ‘reprobation’) be the proposition which says de re of each person who will in fact be damned that he or she will be damned.
The doctrine of predestination is the doctrine that God, from eternity, has issued an efficacious decree of election – that is, God, from eternity, effectively chose that E should be true. The doctrine of double predestination states that in addition to the decree of election, God also issued a decree of reprobation – that is, in addition to effectively choosing that E should be true, God effectively chose that R should be true.
Double predestination is much more contentious among Christians than predestination (although predestination is not entirely uncontroversial – for instance, open theists will have to deny it). Many Christians would rather have single predestination, holding that all people are, on their own, bound for hell, and God intervenes to save those he wishes to save, and just leaves the rest alone.
In his Philosophical Theology (1969), James F. Ross proposes the following analysis of omnipotence:

S is omnipotent if and only if for every logically contingent state of affairs, p, whether p or ~p is the case is logically equivalent to the effective choice, by S, that p or that ~p (respectively). (p. 211)

This analysis appears to have the consequence that, if God is omnipotent, then double predestination is true. Both E and R are true contingent propositions, so if God is omnipotent then God effectively chooses that the corresponding states of affairs should be the case.

more…

The 2012 St. Thomas Summer Seminar in Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology
October 7, 2011 — 9:42

Author: Tim Pawl  Category: News  Tags:   Comments: Off

Recent PhDs and current graduate students are invited to apply to participate in the 2012 St. Thomas Summer Seminar in Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology, a three-week long seminar organized by Dean Zimmerman (Rutgers) and Michael Rota (University of St. Thomas). The seminar will be held at the University of St. Thomas, in St. Paul, Minnesota, from June 17th to July 6th, 2012. Participants will receive a stipend of $3000, as well as room and board.
Topics and speakers:
Dualism and Materialism
Chris Hill (Brown)
Hud Hudson (Western Washington)
Dean Zimmerman (Rutgers)
Freedom and Foreknowledge
Linda Zagzebski (Oklahoma)
David Hunt (Whittier)
The Atonement
Eleonore Stump (Saint Louis University)
Michael Rea (Notre Dame)
Resurrection
Timothy O’Connor (Indiana)
Pascal’s Wager
Thomas Kelly (Princeton)
Michael Rota (St. Thomas)
Neuroscience and Philosophy
Hans Halvorson (Princeton)
Jeffrey Schwartz (UCLA School of Medicine)
The deadline for receipt of applications is December 1, 2011.
For more information, including information on how to apply, go to http://www.stthomas.edu/philosophy/templeton/project.html
This seminar program is funded by a generous grant from the John Templeton Foundation.