2015 SCP Pacific Regional Conference – Call for Papers
December 29, 2014 — 16:09

Author: Michael Almeida  Category: News  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 0

The 2015 Conference of the Society of Christian Philosophers (Pacific Region)

March 20-21, 2015

Hosted by Azusa Pacific University

Keynote Speakers

  • Linda Zagzebski (University of Oklahoma),
  • Robert Audi (University of Notre Dame)

 

Theme: Religious Epistemology in the 21st Century

Advances in technology and interfaith dialogues lead to questions about who or what to trust. Such questions include, for example:

  • How does one decide who (or what) is an expert?
  • How does technology help or hinder inter-faith dialogues?
  • Is there a “virtue epistemology” for surfing the web for information?
  • How can one remain justified in one’s own religious beliefs if one has good reason to believe that a Google search would return millions of arguments against those beliefs?

We invite submissions exploring any topic of interest to Christian philosophers, but those dealing explicitly with the conference theme may be given preference. The conference organizers intend to bring together a wide range of topics and ideas with the hope of fostering a rich and broad discussion among those interested in Christianity and philosophy. We welcome participation from both Christians and non-Christian philosophers as presenters and participants.

Papers (no more than 3000 words) are due by January 15th (extended from January 1st), 2014. Please include professional contact information and an abstract with your paper. Submit them to: pacificscp2015@gmail.com. We intend to notify those accepted by Jan 22nd, 2015.

Student Prizes

Graduate and undergraduate students who wish to be considered for the SCP’s prize for the Best Graduate Student Paper or Best Undergraduate Student Paper must submit a final draft of their papers by January 1st, 2014. Each winner will receive a $400 award, which will be presented publicly at the conference. In your submission email, please indicate that you are a graduate student or undergraduate student.

CFP: BSPR 2015 Conference – Divine Hiddenness
July 14, 2014 — 20:06

Author: Yujin Nagasawa  Category: News  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 0

The BSPR’s Eleventh Conference: Divine Hiddenness

Oriel College, Oxford, Thursday 12th through Sunday 13th September

Saturday 12th will focus on the legacy of Richard Swinburne in honour of his 80th birthday.

Keynote Speakers:

Richard Swinburne (Oxford), Stephen R. L. Clark (Liverpool), Sarah Coakley (Cambridge), Trent Dougherty (Baylor)

Call for Papers:

The problem of the “Hiddenness of God” has been explored in analytic philosophy of religion in recent decades mainly as an issue of theodicy and providence: if God wishes to make Godself transformatively available to humans, why does God not do so more obviously and openly? Many, such as Russell and, more recently, Schellenberg, have taken this to be an argument against theism.

There is however also a deeper ontological issue at stake, that of the apparently intrinsic divine transcendence of God as creator. What philosophical sense can be made of a God who is (it is said) utterly unknowable in ‘essence’ but equally utterly available ‘in energies’, grace and revelation? Is there anything to be gained by a comparison with modern cosmological speculation here? We know what ‘dark matter’ does (namely, pull visible baryonic matter into stars and galaxies) but not what it is.

There is also an epistemological problem, with echoes in other (non-religious) spheres. We may hope one day – though perhaps without much reason – to know the nature of ‘dark matter’, whereas – we are told – God is forever incomprehensible. How – as Hume enquired – does an incomprehensible divinity differ from an equally incomprehensible, non-divine, origin? How does “God does it” differ from “we can never know what does it”?

Papers are invited which probe these philosophical issues from different directions, in connection with Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu or classical pagan traditions, both ancient and modern, and from the perspective of abstract metaphysics and epistemology. The theodicy question in the earlier discussion need not be neglected, but should be considered in the light of the metaphysical and epistemological issues already named.

Please send abstracts either in the body of an email or as a .doc file (no pdfs) of a maximum of 250 words to me (Victoria.Harrison@glasgow.ac.uk) by the end of March 2015. Unfortunately, it will not be possible to consider abstracts that exceed the word limit or that are submitted after the closing date (allowance being made to colleagues in other time zones).

Final versions of accepted papers will be due one month before the conference begins.

Preference will be shown towards papers that are on the theme of the conference. Time and space at the conference will be limited, so we shall have to be selective, even allowing for the fact that we plan to run parallel sessions and request people presenting papers to keep to half-hour slots.

In order to keep to the tight timetabling required to permit participants to hear (the whole of) as many papers as possible, papers should take ideally fifteen minutes and an absolute maximum twenty minutes to deliver, leaving ten minutes or so for discussion.