RIP Marilyn McCord Adams
March 23, 2017 — 1:33

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: Uncategorized  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 0

We learned yesterday of the death of Marilyn McCord Adams. She is the second of the SCP giants to fall (the earlier being Bill Alston). No one living, in my view, can fill their shoes. Those of us who studied at their feet first- or second-hand will spend the rest of our lives simply working out the details and promise of what they wrote. And we won’t even get that fully done. They’re just that much better than us.

In 2010, as Justin McBrayer and I were about to begin our religious epistemology colloquium at the Pacific APA, I noticed Marilyn McCord Adams enter the room. My confidence suddenly crashed, as her reputation as a sharp critic preceded her. And, mirabile visu, we had made T-shirts for our session which we intended to hand out. Would she think this was inappropriate? Would she think it was funny? What should we do?!

She turned out to be delightful, of course, and we hit it off from the word go. A few APA’s later, and she would be my commentator on what would be a central chapter of my book on animal pain. She had very incisive comments, of course, delivered with wit and vigor. But at the same time, she provided great suggestions for solutions to the criticisms she made. In order to provide context for the paper, I sent her the book MS and suggested she may want to read the synopsis of the preceding chapter. She then took it upon herself to provide commentary on the whole book! This was supererogatory in excelsis!

Then, after the book was published, as one of the critics at a book symposium on that book at Calvin College put together by Matt Halteman she expanded both the criticisms and the suggestions for addressing them. It was a small workshop, and we spent two full days together in sessions, at meals, and on field trips. She was spry and qui vive. This was just two summers ago, and you’d never think there was a thing wrong with her. When I knew she fell ill about a year ago, it didn’t even occur to me that she could succumb to death so early. It was, frankly, hard to believe it could happen at all.

In between these events were many brief but fruitful encounters. She was witty, tough, compassionate. Her work was bold, creative, imaginative, yet precise down to each analytic detail. I read her work for so many classes: Medieval Philosophy, Free Will, Philosophy of Religion, and others. Her book on horrendous evils was the greatest inspiration for mine. But in addition to her written work being so insightful and rigorous, for me at least it was FUN. And in addition to her writing being fun, SHE was fun. I loved her rough-and-tumble give and take that was never, that I witnessed, in any way uncharitable. She was going to write the blurb for the back of the paperback version of my book, which will now never happen, and instead I’m going to dedicate my book _God, Suffering, and Sainthood_ to her memory in the hope that it will impel me to make it a book worthy of being dedicated to her.

Pax et bonum,
td

2nd Annual Faith Project Workshop
October 28, 2015 — 21:01

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: News  Tags: ,   Comments: 0

https://blogs.baylor.edu/thefaithproject/

2nd Conference, San Antonio, January 14-17, 2016

On the Value and Evaluation of Faith, Program here.

If you are interested in attending, please email Jon Kvanvig. We have some flexibility for accommodating guests, but it is fairly limited, so the sooner you email me, the better the chance that we’ll be able to include you.

Great TT job at SPU
October 27, 2015 — 13:48

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: News  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 0

Seattle Pacific University, Philosophy: Assistant professor, tenure-track position beginning September 2016 (subject to funding). Ph.D. in philosophy required; teaching experience preferred. AOS: Epistemology or Philosophy of Language. AOC: philosophy of religion, philosophical theology. Teaching responsibilities include multiple sections of a general education course required of all SPU students, which explores issues at the intersection of religion, science, and philosophy. In addition, teaching responsibilities include all or most of the following courses: epistemology, beginning symbolic logic, advanced logic (predicate logic and modal statement logic), philosophy of religion, and philosophical theology. Founded in 1891, Seattle Pacific University has a long and distinguished history in Christian higher education. Its comprehensive academic programs serve more than 4,100 undergraduate and graduate students. Located just minutes from downtown Seattle, SPU seeks to be a premier Christian University fully committed to engaging the culture and changing the world by graduating people of competence and character, becoming people of wisdom, and modeling grace-filled community. Seattle Pacific University seeks applicants committed to its Christian mission. Due to our mission of cultural engagement, SPU is committed to building an excellent and diverse teaching faculty. The online application includes an official SPU application form, a cover letter, a CV, three letters of recommendation, a faith statement of approximately one page, a teaching philosophy statement of approximately one page, and evidence of excellence in teaching. Completed applications should be submitted by November 1. For more information, contact C. Stephen Layman, chair, Philosophy Department, Seattle Pacific University, 3307 Third Ave. West, Seattle, WA 98119 / clayman@spu.edu

CFP: 2016 Logos Workshop in Philosophical Theology: Sin
August 24, 2015 — 21:00

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: News  Tags: , , ,   Comments: 0

Call for Papers

2016 Logos Workshop in Philosophical Theology: Sin

May 5-7, 2016 at the University of Notre Dame

The concept of sin plays an important role in many religious traditions, but it also harbors great complexity. Sometimes we speak as if the concept applies mainly to morally blameworthy actions; but we also speak as if it applies to dispositions or character traits (e.g., ‘the sin of pride’). It is sometimes spoken of as a kind of impurity—something that can be washed away, or from which we can be cleansed. Sometimes it is treated as a kind of weight that can be lifted or carried away. Sometimes it is treated as an agency that resides within us—“no longer am I the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me”. (Rom 7:17) In the Christian tradition, original sin is a condition that we inherit and (for many theologians) something for which we are guilty from birth. What is sin that it can be spoken of in so many ways? Alternatively, how should we disambiguate ‘sin’ so as to avoid talking past one another with this multiply ambiguous word? Are some “images” of sin to be prioritized over others? Does our ontology of sin have any bearing on our understanding of forgiveness, or atonement? The 2016 Logos Workshop will be devoted to addressing these and related philosophical and theological questions about sin and sinfulness.

To have your paper considered for presentation at Logos 2016, please submit an abstract of the paper or the paper itself no later than October 15, 2015. Other things being equal, preference will be given to those who submit full papers by the deadline. We will let you know by December 1, 2015 whether your paper has been provisionally accepted. Full acceptance will be conditional on submission of the full reading version of the paper by April 1, 2015. It is expected that papers presented at the Logos workshop will be works in progress that can benefit from the group discussion. Consequently, we ask that authors not submit papers that will be published before the conference has ended.

Please send Abstracts or Full Papers to: analytictheology.logos@gmail.com
For more information, please visit: http://philreligion.nd.edu/calendar/annual-logos-workshop/

Faith Summer Seminar Deadline!! Feb 1
January 19, 2015 — 16:03

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: News  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 0

Held in Columbia, MO, July 6-July 31, including an attractive financial package for participants (4K for a research project, 3K for housing, $750 for travel to and from the seminar, and $51/day for food). Seminar led by Kvanvig, Howard-Snyder, and Dougherty, with anticipated week-long visits by distinguished philosophers (at this point, commitments from Lara Buchak and Allan Hazlett).

Further details below the fold.

more…

2015 Summer Seminar on The Value and Evaluation of Faith
October 9, 2014 — 14:11

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: News  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 0

Held in Columbia, MO, June 6-July 31, including an attractive financial package for participants (4K for a research project, 3K for housing, $750 for travel to and from the seminar, and $51/day for food). Seminar led by Kvanvig, Howard-Snyder, and Dougherty, with anticipated week-long visits by distinguished philosophers (at this point, commitments from Lara Buchak and Allan Hazlett).

Further details below the fold.

more…

Evil and Hiddenness – Brief meditation
August 21, 2014 — 10:40

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: Existence of God Problem of Evil Religious Belief  Tags: , , , ,   Comments: 3

Thesis 1: The problem of divine hiddenness is, in some reasonable sense, a “deeper” problem than the problem of evil.

Datum 1: If God were vividly present to us, we could suffer almost anything–at least the kinds of things we find on this planet–without (evidential) doubt that God exists (and also with little emotional doubt).

Caveat 1: Datum 1 notwithstanding, one clearly could have some (evidential) doubt that God existed, even if God were vividly present to them throughout the suffering.  For one could have a good argument that one were hallucinating whatever experience it was in virtue of which God was present to them.  In fact, if one’s prior credences were distributed in certain ways, they coud be nearly certain that they were hallucinating.  It is an interesting question whether any reasonable, properly functioning individual could have such credences.  I doubt that it could be so in any nearby world.  (Emotional doubt (or “psychological” doubt, it you prefer) is often irrational, so it can arise under any circumstances.)

St. Stephen, Protomartyr:  So my thesis, taken generically, doesn’t face a serious problem from the Proviso.  My focus is on situations pretty similar to the actual world.  A core example is that of Stephen.  In the Scriptures (Acts 7:54-8:2), as Stephen is being stoned to death (quite unjustly as part of a terrible persecution in which Saul “dragged off men and women and committed them to prison” (8:4)), he says he see’s Jesus, then a bit later he asks Jesus to receive his spirit in a standard formula of acknowledging imminent death, then finally prays for their forgiveness.

The implication seems clear that the way he accepted his death is importantly related to (inspired and sustained by) his experience of Jesus being present to him (in some kind of vision, in this case).  There are other similar stories both of historical martyrs and one’s I’ve heard more closely.  Contrast this “peace that passes understanding” with cases where people feel “alone” during suffering and have a kind of irreligious experience (See Gellman 1992 and my enormous MS on the “Common Sense Problem of Evil) that serves as data for an argument for atheism from evil.

Caveat 2: I think that, formally speaking, the problem of divine hiddenness *just is* an instance of the problem of evil (my Routledge Encyclopedia entry on Divine Hiddenness discusses this (it’s behind a pay-wall, sorry but I’ll send it to you if you want).  In light of this, I have to modify my thesis slightly (but not substantively).

Revised thesis: The “real” problem of evil *just is* the problem of divine hiddenness.

Action point: For my own part, I will be focusing much more on the reasons God hides (in the sense in which he does, I mean, almost everyone believes in God or at least the supernatural, so there’s actually a problem formulating the problem, which I also plan to work on) than on the reasons why he allows evil in general (confession: how did that ever get to be a “problem”?).  I will continue to spend time on special cases like animal suffering (more to say there than appears in _The Problem of Animal Pain: A Theodicy for All Creatures Great and Small_, I cut three chapters and have had many thoughts sense.  But I think of the following two questions

Q1: Why would God allow S to suffer *that*, X [insert horrendous evil]?

Q2: Why wouldn’t God be a present comfort to S as she goes through X?

we have more to learn by pursuing Q2 than by Q1.  (Call that Thesis 2.)

Call for Papers: Bellingham Summer Phil Conf
January 3, 2013 — 18:10

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: News  Comments: 0

All the info is here: http://myweb.facstaff.wwu.edu/nmarkos/BSPC/BSPC2013/BSPC_2013/BSPC_2013.html

Defending Divine Perfection, Live today at 2:30 Eastern
December 4, 2012 — 13:01

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: Concept of God News  Tags:   Comments: 1

At HuffPost Live, today at 2:30pm Eastern, I’ll be responding to this NYT Opinionator blog post which throws God’s perfection overboard.
Tune in!

RIP John Kavanaugh, S.J.
November 12, 2012 — 22:21

Author: Trent Dougherty  Category: News  Tags: ,   Comments: 1

Here are some brief words by Jeremy Neill, followed by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch obit. Though I only spoke with him a few times, I join Jeremy and others in mourning his loss and commending his soul to the Father of Lights.
John Kavanaugh, S.J., a beloved mentor and philosophy professor at Saint Louis University, died this week in St. Louis. He was 71. To those of us in the Saint Louis Philosophy Department who knew him and were counseled by him, he was a teacher of deep skill and pedagogical sensitivity. Equally at home on the Catholic right and the Catholic left, Fr. Kavanaugh left a lasting legacy on a generation of Jesuits and philosophy graduate students at Saint Louis University. His compassion for the poor and underprivileged of this earth was matched only by his powerful support for the most underprivileged persons of all – the unborn. Not afraid to write for popular philosophical audiences, his columns and books reached a vast audience among Catholics in the United States and around the world. He will be deeply missed by his students and friends. May the God of Peace, who brought forth from the dead the Lord Jesus Christ, the great Shepherd of the Sheep, now carry Fr. Kavanaugh’s soul to its eternal rest.
Jeremy Neill
I have copied below Fr. Kavanaugh’s obituary from the St. Louis city newspaper, the Post-Dispatch.
Rev. John Kavanaugh dies at 71; acclaimed philosopher and eloquent preacher at St. Louis University
The Rev. John Kavanaugh, who died this week at age 71, spent part of his year of prayer as a young Jesuit priest working in Calcutta for Mother Teresa. She took him to the House of the Dying, a former temple she had converted to a home for women and men found dying on the streets. Father Kavanaugh washed and fed those patients, most of whom would never leave the facility alive. He recalled how he and others had tried but failed to help a man who was close to death. But when Mother Teresa took the man’s face in her hands, his eyes opened and she was able to engage him. She had a powerful ability to connect with the poor.
It was a transforming experience for the young Jesuit, Father Kavanaugh recalled later. He went on to become an acclaimed philosophy professor at St. Louis University and an eloquent preacher who delivered powerful homilies. He gained attention for his opposition to the death penalty and the war in Iraq. The Rev. John Francis Kavanaugh died Monday (Nov. 5, 2012) at St. Louis University Hospital. He had been on medical leave from the university while doctors tried to determine the cause of a mysterious blood disease he had come down with earlier this year, his order said Tuesday. Father Kavanaugh specialized in the study of ethics. He taught a course in medical ethics and founded the Ethics Across the Curriculum program at the university to help faculty members incorporate ethics into their own studies and courses. He wrote an ethics column for the Jesuit publication “America Magazine.” Earlier this year, his column described how both political parties had become rigid and “driven by the rhetoric of extremists.” He had voted for “the hope” promised by Barack Obama four years ago, he wrote. He was disgusted, he said, with those who he said had slandered Obama with outright lies. But he went on to condemn the president for his use of drone missiles “and the horror they bring to innocent people.” He compared it to torture and rewriting the principles of a just war. He concluded by suggesting that he couldn’t vote for either the Democrat nor the Republican and planned to write in a third candidate.
Father Kavanaugh was reared in St. Louis and was ordained a priest in 1971. He earned a degree in philosophy at St. Louis University and a doctorate at Washington University in 1974. The next year, he went to India for a year of tertianship — prayer, reflection and service. He returned in 1976 to St. Louis University, where he spent the next 36 years. He became the spiritual guiding force for generations of young Jesuits. He wrote books and syndicated columns on consumerism, advertising, faith and culture. His most famous book, “Following Christ in a Consumer Society,” was first published in 1981 and was reissued twice. In 2001, he opposed the death penalty for Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh saying, “we will have become just a little more like him.” Father Kavanaugh was a soccer player at St. Louis University High School and a handball fanatic. He played the guitar and performed traditional ballads with a half-dozen members of his family who traced their roots to the counties Galway, Kerry and Mayo in Ireland. Visitation will be 5 to 7:30 p.m. Friday at St. Francis Xavier (College) Church at the university. The funeral Mass will follow at 7:30 p.m. Burial will be Saturday at Calvary Cemetery, with departure from the church at 8:15 a.m.
Among the survivors is a brother, Thomas Kavanaugh of St. Louis.